Saint John the Evangelist Seminary

A Commitment of the Evangelical Catholic Church for Academic Formation

Est. 2006

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saint John the Evangelist Seminary

 

SC 502:  The Synoptic Gospels

Course Syllabus 

 

Bishop James Wilkowski

 

Course Description:

The Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke offer us the earliest surviving accounts of Jesus' life and teaching. It comes as no surprise, then, that they have been largely responsible for determining both the Church's understanding of Christ and the historian's reconstructions of

the man from Nazareth. In this course we will look closely at these three documents as story, as theology, and as history.

 

LEARNING GOALS

 

By the end of the course, all students should be able to:

Summarize the contents and theology of the Gospel of Mark.

Describe the ways in which the contents and theology of Luke and Matthew differ from that of Mark.

Describe and Critically evaluate different models of the authorship and provenance of each of the Synoptic Gospels.

Describe the phenomenon of overlap among the Synoptic Gospels (the Synoptic Problem) and critically evaluate different models of the relationship between them.

Critically evaluate different models of the early Jesus tradition.

Identify the form of a given Gospel pericope and discuss the implications of that form.

Critically evaluate the arguments for or against the authenticity of a particular saying in the Gospels.

Critically evaluate the arguments for or against the historicity of a particular event described in the Gospels.

 

TEXTBOOKS

 

Nickle, Keith F. The Synoptic Gospels: An Introduction. Revised. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2001.

 

The Bible (New Testament with the Apocrypha or Deutero-canonical books). Any of the following translations are satisfactory:

New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)

New Jerusalem Bible (NJB)

New International Version (NIV)

 

 

Study Outline

 

Introduction: The Synoptic Gospels in Faith and History

1. The Old Testament Story

2. Judaism "between the Testaments"

3. The Dynamics of Oral Traditions

4. The Dynamics of the Gospel Traditions

 

Mark: Authorship and Provenance

1. Mark 1:1-13 Jesus' Emergence (Prologue)

2. Mark 1:14-39 Overview of Galilean Ministry

3. Mark 1:40-3:6 Three Miracles and Three Controversies

4. Mark 3:7-35 The Variety of Responses to Jesus

5. Redaction criticism and Mark

6. Mark 4:1-34 Jesus' Use of Parables

7. The Authenticity of Jesus' Sayings in Mark

8. Mark 4:35-6:6 Jesus' Victory over Chaotic Forces

9. Mark 6:7-30 Success and the Foreshadowed End

10. Mark 6:31-8:21 The Variety of Responses to Jesus

11. Mark 8:22-10:52 The "Way Narrative"

12. Mark 11-12 The Confrontation in the Jerusalem Temple

13. Mark 13 The "Little Apocalypse"

14.  Mark 14-16 The Passion Narrative

 

The Synoptic Problem: Basic Models

The Synoptic Problem: The Question of Q

 

1. The Gospels of Matthew and Luke: The Infancy Narratives

2. The Gospel of Matthew: Structure and Redaction

3. The Gospel of Matthew: The Sermon on the Mount

4. The Gospel of Matthew: Structure and Redaction

5. The Gospel of Matthew: Structure and Redaction

6. The Gospel of Matthew: Provenance and Purpose

7. The Gospel of Luke: Structure and Redaction

8. The Gospel of Luke: Structure and Redaction

9. The Gospel of Luke: Structure and Redaction

10. The Gospel of Luke: Structure and Redaction

11. Gospel of Luke: Provenance and Purpose

12. The Synoptic Gospels and the Historical Jesus

 

Assignments TBA

 

 

 
 

The Evangelical Catholic Church: A Welcoming Community of Faith Rooted in the Catholic Tradition
2013

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